Photo: iStock

Baby Sea Turtle first time in water

Baby-Turtle-Ocean-Swim-Conservation-Environment.jpg

It's World Oceans Day today, which means folk all over the planet are celebrating our oceans and how to protect them for the future.

Only 2.8 per cent of the world's oceans are protected (compared to 10 to 15 per cent of land). Without the ocean, life on earth would not be able to exist.

This One Shockingly Simple Step Could Eliminate Plastic From Our Oceans Forever

So how can you help? There are hundreds of places in the world where you can take part in marine conservation projects - from tracking whales' migration patterns in Australia to releasing baby turtles into the wild.

Interested in helping the environment abroad? Read on...

TRACKING HUMPBACK WHALES IN AUSTRALIA

Photo: iStock

Humpback Whale Tail at Sunset

Moreton Bay Marine Park near Brisbane in Australia is home to a healthy population of humpback whales but their population has stopped growing. Scientists are trying to discover what is causing this shift – whether its urban development or warmer waters.

You can help the crew study these whales for four days – by recording underwater sounds, collect whale spray and conducting other surveys to analyse the whales' behaviour.

Find our more information on the Earthwatch Institute website.

RELEASE BABY TURTLES INTO THE WILD IN BALI

Photo: St. Regis Bali

Turtle Hatching St. Regis Bali Ocean

Deep in the heart of Indonesia, you'll find a turtle hatchery in the most unlikely place – the St Regis Resort in Bali.

After the turtles have laid their eggs, staff protect them from predators until they hatch and are ready to be released into the ocean. Guests can visit the hatchery and release the newborn baby turtles back into the sea.

Find our more information on the St Regis Bali website.

STUDY GREAT WHITE SHARKS IN SOUTH AFRICA

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Great White Shark Conservation South Africa Responsible Travel

If you're a shark lover, then this is the conservation adventure for you. Responsible Travel run a seven day great white shark conservation project in South Africa.

You will be taught how to collect data out at sea, go cage-diving to observe markings and behaviour plus basic seamanship skills. There's also a chance to go an explore a penguin colony and explore South Africa's southernmost point.

Find out more information on the Responsible Travel website.

SAVE CORAL REEFS IN LANGKAWI, MALAYSIA

Photo: The Andaman

Coral Nursery Reef Andaman Langkawi Malaysia

You can take part in the active conservation of a live coral reef in Malaysia. The Andaman Reef is an 8,000 year old coral reef on the island of Langkawi. Once or twice a month, guests are invited to clear away dead coral from the reef, giving the living coral a better chance of surviving.

There are also guided snorkel tours around the Coral Nursery where you can learn more about the complex ecosystem and why it's so delicate and important to protect.

Find out more on The Andaman, a Luxury Collection Resort, Langkawi website.

STUDY DOLPHINS IN THE AZORES, PORTUGAL

Photo: Biosphere Expeditions

Dolphins Conservation Ocean Azores Portual Biosphere Expeditions

The Azores Archipelago in Portugal is one of the best places to study dolphins along with whales and loggerhead turtles.

You'll be working as part of a small international team taking photos of dolphins, recording their vocalisations and tagging them – all to help study the animal's history and migration patterns across the ocean.

Find out more on the Biosphere Expeditions website.

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