Skiing

Watch: Sammy Carlson Go Backwards Off A 24-Storey Ski Jump Known As Copper Peak

Sammy Carlson might just be the bravest skier of all-time.

Screen Shot: Teton Gravity Research.

How many of you out there are courageous enough to try your luck off a 24-storey ski jump? Not many, we imagine. Now, same question but with a scary twist. How many of you would be brave enough to go flying off a 24-storey ski jump…backwards? None of you, surely,

Backwards? Off a ski jump?! That’s not brave, it’s suicide.

Well, hold onto your hats people because Teton Gravity Research have just dropped a jaw-dropping video featuring 7-time X Games medalist, and 3-time Real Ski Champion, Sammy Carlson jumping off Michigan’s Copper Peak (the largest ski jump in the Western Hemisphere).

Screen Shot: Teton Gravity Research.

Copper Peak was built in 1970 along the shores of Lake Superior. It’s a 300-ton steel structure, and is named after the mineral deposits found during its construction (a 140-pound copper nugget was supposedly unearthed near the present day judge’s stand).

By doing tricks off this absolute monster, Sammy Carlson has placed himself in the record books as the first skier to a hit a “ski-flying” long jump with freestyle intent. It would have been impressive enough if he’d just done a few tricks off it, but by throwing some switches into the reckoning the whole thing just goes up a notch on the epic-o-metre.

This was shot as part of The Sammy C Project.

You May Also Like:

8 Must-Go Snow Festivals You Don’t Want To Miss This Season

From Winter Olympic Injustice To High Speed Urban Skate Racing – The Remarkable Latest Chapter For Alain Baxter

Share

Newsletter Terms & Conditions

Please enter your email so we can keep you updated with news, features and the latest offers. If you are not interested you can unsubscribe at any time. We will never sell your data and you'll only get messages from us and our partners whose products and services we think you'll enjoy.

Read our full Privacy Policy as well as Terms & Conditions.

production